Donelson Diary

Interesting Intimate Items of Donelson's Daily Developments

Volume 1 - Number 51

Donelson, Davidson County, Tennessee

8 May 1947

Clem's Clippings

Unusual Items, None Expected To Be Read

Sometimes we're just plain flabber-gasted over our mistakes. If we ever put out a paper which doesn't have something wrong, Uncle Joe Stalin and General Marshall will likely kiss and make up. Here we're just an issue away from that first birthday and have carried one mistake all that time which it took a friend in New York to notice. We've never noticed it and no one has called it to our attention. The mistake was in the spelling of "developments" on the first page. We had an extra "E."

Some unusual things have been happening at Mrs. Blanche Torrence's. First, Louise Hulett had an accident. We don't know where Howard was but Louise was mowing the lawn in her sock feet and nearly managed to sever her big toe. And then Mrs. Torrence had trouble backing around in her car and tore up a mailbox. Finally, Howard's baby chicks apparently didn't know enough to get in out of the rain and they all almost drowned in one of our recent rains. Never a dull moment!

 

Soapy Casteel, that itinerant extra-ordinaire, blew in town early this week to see if Mary Linder was at last wearing a size 34 uniform (she is) and dropped in at the DIARY office. Soapy was somewhat burned up over the fake laughter and applause on a few comedy radio programs. Soapy, in one of his bitterest moods, said if there was a way to get the Donelson TC Union Station to each program they wouldn't have to force those laughs.

Cousin Joe Johnson has a few collector's items in the way of unusual coins. The prime and oldest coin is a copper one-half cent piece minted in 1800. He also has a one-dollar gold piece struck in 1863, a copper 2-cent minted in 1865, a big copper penny dated 1845 and another in 1842. Another unusual coin in his possession is a half dollar, commemorating Stone Mountain, struck in 1925.

The benefit dinner at the Grammar School Friday night was the sort of an affair which should be staged more often. The food was delicious and plentiful served in pleasant surroundings which included a professional job of flower-decorating on the tables. Everyone enjoyed the contacts with seldom-seen neighbors and didn't miss the money. All of this reminded us of the old days when we used to accompany Dad to those Father-and-Son banquets. Let's do it more often!

Society and Local News Items

Have New Daughter

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Phillips on Bluefield Avenue, who have a new daughter, born Monday morning at Vanderbilt Hospital.

Smith-Arnott Wedding Rites Solemnized Last Sunday

Miss Alice Louise Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Walker Smith, became the bride of Robert Lochhead Arnott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Arnott of Brooklyn, New York, in a ceremony at 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon, April 27, at the Andrew Price Memorial Methodist Church....

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An Editorial

Maintaining the policy that the DIARY, as a community newspaper, shall do everything in its power to promote the general welfare of the community which it serves, and whereas, the destruction of telephone cables by a party or parties unknown this week has jeopardized the safety and welfare of the community, the DIARY herewith adds the sum of $25 to the rewards already offered by the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, for the arrest and conviction of the party or parties unknown who committed this destruction.

The DIARY further calls upon the two civic organizations representing the population of Donelson --

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DDT Paint

Lower Lights

By Mary Alice Adams

MY MOTHER

With masses soft of snowy hair
With dear face lined by heavy care,
My Mother.
A weary child, my head found rest
Safe cradled there upon her breast,
my Mother.

Now older grown, my aching heart
Finds refuge there from pain and hurt, my Mother.
And Heaven itself, all pearl and gold,
Will lovlier be, because 'twill hold my Mother.

--Minnie E. Kennedy.

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Clem's Clippings

Unusual Items, None Expected To Be Read

Sometimes we're just plain flabber-gasted over our mistakes. If we ever put out a paper which doesn't have something wrong, Uncle Joe Stalin and General Marshall will likely kiss and make up. Here we're just an issue away from that first birthday and have carried one mistake all that time which it took a friend in New York to notice. We've never noticed it and no one has called it to our attention. The mistake was in the spelling of "developments" on the first page. We had an extra "E."

Some unusual things have been happening at Mrs. Blanche Torrence's. First, Louise Hulett had an accident. We don't know where Howard was but Louise was mowing the lawn in her sock feet and nearly managed to sever her big toe. And then Mrs. Torrence had trouble backing around in her car and tore up a mailbox. Finally, Howard's baby chicks apparently didn't know enough to get in out of the rain and they all almost drowned in one of our recent rains. Never a dull moment!

Read more ...